When You See Fish You Think Is A Koi, You Don’t Know What To Do With Them

When you see fish you think is a koi, you don’t know what to do with them. 

That’s a problem for a lot of people, and a new study by a team of researchers at the University of Arizona and the University at Albany has found that they’re less likely to think they’re catching a fish than they are when they catch it. 

It’s not a new finding: previous research has shown that people are more likely to underestimate fish weight and body size when caught than when they’re caught. 

But this study, published today in the journal PLOS ONE, is the first to look at how people are perceived by fish in the wild, and specifically the big fish in which they are caught.

The researchers used an online survey of over 1,000 U.S. residents between the ages of 20 and 84. 

They found that when asked about the fish’s size, most people thought they were getting one that was a medium size, such as a bluegill. 

Then, they found that people were far more likely than they were to overestimate the size of the fish when they caught it.

What makes the difference? 

They think the difference is how they see the fish, and the way they think about it.

“We found that fish perceived as large are viewed as being less desirable by those who are more confident about their fish size and weight than fish perceived to be small,” lead author Sarah J. Rochon, a PhD student at the UA, said in a press release.

“This was true regardless of how much confidence people had in their own catch.”

For the study, the researchers asked the people whether they thought the fish was a small, medium or large, and how much they thought it weighed. 

A majority of respondents thought the average size of a fish was medium.

But, when asked whether they would eat a fish that was the same size as their own, about half of those surveyed said they would.

The study authors then took the respondents’ perceptions of the size and shape of fish into account.

They found that the people who were more confident in their catch size were more likely and more likely overall to underestimate the size than those who were less confident.

“This indicates that fish perceptions can vary significantly across people,” Rochont said.

“In particular, perceptions of fish size vary among people with different levels of confidence in their abilities and experiences to catch fish.” 

The study suggests that people who are confident about the size that they have to catch can be less likely than others to be confident about how much the fish actually weighs.

“Our findings suggest that, when we use fish to assess fish size, we are more apt to underestimate a fish’s true size and not underestimate its weight,” the researchers wrote in their paper.

“The more confident we are about our ability to catch a fish, the less likely we are to overestimation a fish.

This can have important implications for fisheries and aquaculture, which rely on fish as a key ingredient for successful fish processing.”

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