What’s on your fish-watching bucket list?

With the number of fish being caught soaring, it’s hard to see a future where the world’s oceans don’t need more fish.

The catch of the year is the koi fish, the most popular of the freshwater fish.

It is one of the most prized in the world, and its popularity has been boosted by the arrival of the popular new Kodiak salmon in the Pacific.

But Koi are also the mainstay of many people’s fish bucket lists.

For those of you who don’t fish, there’s a reason why.

Koi eat the plankton that make up plankton food, so they’re not just tasty, but nutritious too.

Kois are also very easy to catch and keep, so there’s no need to trawl the ocean for them.

And there are more Koi than you’d think.

The top 10 species of fish that have caught the world record are:1.

Koiyas (Koi)3.

Osprey (Osprey)4.

Alaskan King Salmon (King Salmon)5.

Albatross (Bluefin Tuna)6.

Blacktail (Blacktail)7.

Salmon (Salmon)8.

Yellowtail (Yellowtail)9.

Bluefin Tern (Blue-fin Tusk)10.

Snapper (Snapper)The top five species of salmon have all been recorded by anglers, with the top three, Ospreys, the King Salmon and the Bluefin tuna.

Albatrosses have the most fish, followed by salmon, king salmon and the Yellowtail.

And the salmon have caught up with the King salmon, with their catch doubling in the last decade.

There are now about 5,400 species of marine fish in the ocean, and scientists believe that over the next century, there could be as many as 7,000 species of the same.

These include sea lions, dolphins, sharks, rays, seabirds, rays and sharks.

The catch of fish is a big issue for the oceans and the economy of the world.

There are many things we can do to help.

But the bottom line is that more fish is good for the environment, and the world is on track to be far more fish-rich than it is now.