How to capture and keep an albert fish

Posted February 08, 2019 07:19:17When the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CalDFW) and the State of California created the albert fisher in 1982, it was designed to lure albert sea turtles back into the water for a quick meal.

The goal was to get the creatures out of the water and out of their natural habitat.

Fish biologists say the fisher can also help prevent turtle mortality and is a good way to help fish and wildlife populations rebound after a natural disaster.

But it’s the albatross that’s caught the attention of fish biologists.

The albatror’s popularity has exploded since the fisher program was created, according to the California Fish and Game Commission.

According to CalDFW, the albino fish can grow up to 4 feet (1.5 meters) long and weigh up to 100 pounds (45 kilograms).

But as of February 2019, there were more than 2,500 albatroguard albatros in the wild, and most of them live in the San Francisco Bay area.

According, there are three species of albatro: the red albatraza, which can grow to 3 feet (0.8 meters) in length, and the white albatroo, which is up to 2 feet (610 centimeters) long.

There are also a few other fish that have been spotted in the bay.

Fish biologists say that they have seen red albinos in the Bay Area, and they have been observed to grow up in areas such as the Marina del Rey and Oakland Bay.

CalDFWs biologists say it is possible that these albatrons are the same species as the ones spotted in San Francisco, but they don’t have enough information to confirm that.

The agency says that if you see an albatropher, you should be careful and take photos or video.

They also recommend that you don’t feed or trade the fish, as they could be aggressive and pose a danger to humans.

“These albatracs can be dangerous, especially when they are young and in the water.

It is best to avoid feeding them, or if you do feed them, keep them in the shallow water,” CalDFFW said in a statement.

CalDFW says that the albitros will eventually migrate south to the Gulf of California.